Jasmine Kelekay

Graduate Student

Specialization

Race and Racism; Law, Crime, and Punishment; Policing; Black Feminism; Social Movements; Critical Race Theory; Black Europe and African Diaspora Studies; Culture, Media, & Discourse; Hip Hop

Education

B.A., Connecticut College, Sociology, Philosophy, and Psychology)

Bio

Jasmine Kelekay is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, with an interdisciplinary emphasis in Black Studies. She is currently a visiting researcher in the Department of Criminology at Stockholm University, as well as at CEMFOR (Center for Multidisciplinary Studies on Racism) at Uppsala University. Her work explores how ideas about Blackness are circulated globally yet shaped by local contexts, histories, and intersecting identities. In particular, she examines the relationship between racialization and criminalization, with a focus on constructions on the punitive policing of African diasporic populations, and the ways in which African diasporic communities construct and enact counter-hegemonic identities and discourses in response to racial oppression. 

Courses

Kelekay has taught and co-taught several courses in sociology, gender studies, and criminology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Åbo Akademi University, and Helsinki University.

At UCSB, she has been a TA for courses including:
- SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology (with Lisa Hajjar and A
- SOC 173: Sociology of Law (with Lisa Hajjar)
- SOC 170J: Juvenile Justice (with Victor Rios)
- SOC 174P: Policing and Society (with Geoffrey Raymond)
- SOC 185D: Theories of Race and Ethnicity (with Howard Winant)
In 2019, Kelekay designed and taught a special topics course on Race, Crime, and Justice (SOC 139RN).

Since 2018, Kelekay has has co-taught several online courses in gender studies and criminology at Åbo Akademi and Helsinki University in Finland, and in 2020, Kelekay designed and taught a sociology course titled Race, Ethnicity, and Nation in Europe at Åbo Akademi Open University.